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a centralized state of economy to a mixed economy that evolves from central state economy aspects and some market aspects, but not in the manner that actually allowed the market to be efficient at all. >> when did this change occur from centralized next? >> most of these countries, the late developed countries, they underwent a period where they had to actually involve the masses in order to gain support. and legitimacy. when this process, for a variety of reasons began to create problems for the regimes in power, and when external support and pressure for some of these regimes and for some of the directions that were unable at the time moving towards a market economy around the 1980s took place, you saw a lot of these third world regimes, or the global south, begin to move from a central economy to more market oriented economy and the international financial institutions like the imf and the world bank played a role in doing so, because they would literally place condition now is on loans. the conditionality and called moving markets into the economy. >> what role does the assad regime pl
. the latest gdp provisions looks like the economy may finally genuinely be in a real recovery. it increased by 3.1%. of course, we've been here before many times over the past four years and each time it appears that the economy is going to achieve a philosophy, it gets pulled back to earth. there are two issues. cyclical, how and when we will once achieve full employment and strong growth and structural issues, what aspects do the fundamentals of our country work and not work. barack obama has insisted it won't be enough to cover the downturn and the economy needs fundamental reform and invention. >> i know that we'll have to overcome our doubts and our divisions and we're going to have to overcome a determined opposition of powerful special interests before we can truly reform a broken economy and advanced opportunity. >> if we take seriously the idea of emerging from the great crisis into a radically new economy, be there are core questions about what that economy will look like that almost no one in our political class is asking. what is the proper role of finance, a sector that account
reached a deal to stop tax rises in spending cuts from damaging the american and the global economy? hillary clinton is being treated at this hospital in new york. she has a blood clot. there's concern over the health of the venezuelan president who has suffered complications after cancer surgery in cuba. walk into bbc world news. coming up, and look back at the british troops as they prepared handover to afghan forces. new zealand becomes the first major city to welcome 2013. time is running out for politicians in the united states to strike a deal to prevent the economy from going over the so- called fiscal cliff. that is when a package of automatic spending cuts and tax rises comes into fact which could set the country back into recession. that less than 20 hours into the generate the first deadline. >> as night descended on washington, no deal precentors went home with a low over 24 hours to go before the huge austerity package known as the fiscal cliff, something almost nobody wants is due to descend on the american economy. >> we will come in at 11:00 tomorrow morning and that
. and the american people are not going to have any patience for a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. not right now. >> alas, this is how we do things now, create economic storms then look to provide an umbrella at the last possible second. we avert disaster but move no closer to solving our long-term economic problems. after a moment of spiritual clarity on friday afternoon, harry reid is working on a bipartisan deal ostensibly with his republican adversary mitch mcconnell. >> -- engaged in discussions, the majority leader and myself and the white house, in the hopes that we can come forward as early as sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference and the majority leader can make to his conference. >> well, if the senate manages to reach a compromise, the hope is that the house would follow. that's option one. the green one. option two is less certain. president obama reportedly challenged congressional leaders from both parties on friday to come up with a deal better than the one he proposed. the center piece of which is that the top marginal tax rate will incr
still waiting. wh but would no deal be better for the fiscal economy than a rushed deal. brenda buttner, bulls and bears. gary b smith, tobin smith. jonas max ferris. a no deal better than a bad deal. >> it would create more uncertainty or one of the deals they're talking about, which is raising taxes and now, and they trust us, we'll get to the spending cuts later on, let's not worry about that right now. the last thing we want to see is a weak-need congress and a weak-willed president patting themselves on the back because they have some watered down deal. i think they need to feel some pain, i think they need to see he the implications in the markets, in the economy, so, yes, i think no deal right now is better than a bad deal. >> okay, gary b, jim mentioned the market, let me play wall street on tv. basically i'm sick of this. i'm going to keep heading south because the uncertainty, the anxiety is killing me. if we had any kind of deal, at least we might see stocks move up a bit. that would be good for our 401(k)'s, wouldn't it? >> that's exactly my perspective, brenda. this was a r
in europe of binding disparate economies by means of common currency. this is not the first time these things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are bound together monetarily. missouri and washington state are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory t
and its potential impact on our economy brought lawmakers from both houses to washington for last-minute negotiations. concerns about the cliff spooked investors, the holiday shortened trading week was lighter in volume but higher in volatility. the worst decline of the month on thursday after a disappointing read on consumer confidence and some statements by congressional leaders. and yet, with one final trading day to go, all the major averages were still showing positive performance for the year of 2012. meantime, the u.s. is set to reach the debt limit on monday. that, according to treasury secretary tim geithner in a letter to congress, though, he did say he expects to take what he called extraordinary measures to extend the government's borrowing ability for another two months or so. and even your cup of coffee wants a deal on the fiscal cliff. baristas at the 120 starbucks in washington, d.c. were encouraged by management to add a shot of bipartisanship to their drink orders and remind customers in our nation's capital to come together. >> wall street is typically quieter t
of the economy. you don't want to pay off the debt but you want it to fall. host: how did we get to this point? why is the government spending so much and under this president, we've seen the debt go up $1 trillion each year over the last four years. where is it going? guest: there are two main ways to look at it. right now, we're still coming out of this economic crisis. so you have large debts for four years mainly because you have low revenues as people don't have jobs or they are getting paid less. then there has been extra spending programs over the last four years but also, we have this mandatory spending programs that grow on auto pilot. over the last four years they have grown because they represent the basic social safety net that we have when we enter recessions. so food stamps, medicaid, they spend more when the economy is bad. so i think that is the main thing to look at when you look at the last four years. there are some structural issues that we don't blame but look towards to explain why people are afraid of debts over the long-term. that is because our mandatory spending progr
tomorrow. so we will have avoided a catastrophic event for the economy but we still could have done better with the timing. adam: let's point out some of the details what's in the work in senate. we understand the deal, at least for taxes which mitch mcconnell, said, taken care of. taxes going up for anybody making 400,000, single person, $450,000 for a married couple. we understand that. as soon as it gets to the house, tomorrow? and when could the house vote on this. >> assuming speaker boehner brings the senate bill to the house floor for a vote. we don't have confirmmation he will do that, it could be as early as tomorrow morning assuming the senate acts, at which point we pass it to get it on the president's desk by the end of the day tomorrow. adam: it doesn't include any of the spending cuts that republicans have been adamant about getting. spending out of control. democrats and republicans agree upon that. how does speaker boehner rally members of his caucus who did not rally behind him about a week ago if there are no spending cuts? >> a couple of things. remember the sequestratio
new cabinet is taking all the challenges the country faces, including a sluggish economy and last year's disaster. abe explained in his news conference his cabinet is designed to overcome the crisis. he says reviving the economy is a top priority. >> translator: a strong economy is the basis of japan's power. reviving a strong economy is essential to japan's future. my cabinet will carry out bold financial policies, well-timed fiscal policies and a strategy to encourage private investment toward economic growth. my cabinet will carry out these economic policies and achieve results. >> are prime minister abe says he and his minister also devote energy to foreign policy. he says they will strengthen diplomatic and security policies. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south korea and even with the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening japan/ize lie yans is the first step toward rebuilding japan's diplomacy and security. >> abe promised the central government
hurts the economy. it's quite possible that's true. the central question is whether it will hurt that much to raise incox taxes a little bit on the highest part of the highest earners in the country. to push the country to the edge of a recession over this is quite irresponsible. the increase in taxes will hardly affect the economy. but you know, that's my opinion. my opinion should count as much as anyone else's. the problem is in washington, one person's opinion carries disproportionate weight. that person is grover norquist, the head of americans for tax reform. a group that's got a pledge that most members of the republican congress signed saying they won't raise taxes under any circumstances. i spoke to norquist after friday and asked him about taxes and almost relimgous belief that tax increases, any tax increase is bad for the economy. >> we've seen that whenever you raise the capital gains tax. the top margins tax, tax increases distract from what the country needs to do. we need to deal with our run-away government spending, the government is spending too much money. tax
will have a strong economy if we continue to punish people who produce and somehow reward people who don't. and we have also had a foreign policy that is supposed to make a stronger and more respected, but it hasn't worked out either. let's just put it this way. if that is flexibility, we all better learn to be very flexible the next four years. earlier this month susan rice withdrew her name from consideration from post of secretary of state. that's after strong opposition to her potential nomination. republicans were critical of her after she went on five different sunday news shows. she gave this explanation for the terrorist attacks that killed four americans in benghazi, libya on september 11th. >> the best assessment we have is that in fact this was not a pre planned, premeditated attack. what happened initially was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo. it was a consequence of the video that people gathered outside the embassy, and then it grew very violent. those with extremist ties joined the fray and came with heavy weapons which unfortunately are quite co
weather warnings. it is down to the wire. scramble since we have watched the economy go off the major cliff. president obama is saying they will have a agreement. this later on america's news headquarters. now back to forbes on fox . for all of your latest headlines. >> as the clock ticks down. new report shows that american workers are not using up all of the vacation time. they are said to be seen as lazy and losing their job. this is a good sign for the economy. how so, steve. not for those two reasons . we don't have too much vacation or little. we do it just right. europe had work like we did. you want lopping beer vacation you can have a stagnant economy like europe. we raise taxes we'll have longer vacation but fewer jobbings. >> you are right. we don't want to be like the french. and people here in the united states and government union. and i was on vacation and check my blackberry and read a rick unger e-mail while on vacation. >> you are never on vacation. >> you work it anyway. nine out of the 10 are checking their work phones. any time to rejuvenate and come back ragged.
most recent book is this, "the coming prosperity how entrepreneurs or transforming the global economy." sure is the cover of the book. professor auerswald, what role does your play in economic development? >> well, that's a great question the and media i will talk about what role does fear play in our conversation about development and our conversation about our present, so when we talk about our reality and share our ideas in the marketplace we are competing with other ideas. there are three things about marketplaces for ideas. short-term sells better than long-term, fear sells better than hoped, negative sells better than positive and exaggerated but in moderate so we see a disproportionate number of short term narrative's of negative exaggerated stories and essentially commesso short-term negative. that's what's represented the marketplace ideas and there's actually good reasons for that. we are creatures that grew up in environments where we were always subject to threat so we are looking at things that are going to hurt us, but we are no longer in those environments. we are in a
any patients for a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. >> the president said he was modestly optimistic that the january 1 deadline for the fiscal cliff could be averted, but that is contingent on a vote in the senate on a compromise bill, and that will have to get an up or down vote. there is a majority for that, with some tax increases for upper-income people. the question is what level would be acceptable to republicans. more crucial to that is, whatever the senate proposes and passes on to the house, will it be acceptable to the majority of republicans in the house, who control that body? if it is not, we may be having another confrontation, and go past the january 1 deadline, and we could see those tax increases go into effect. again, there is the fallback position. if the pressure on the republicans is great enough, they may have to change their position after january 1. congress can always pass something retroactively, which would have an effect retroactively. but the damage would be done to the republican image of being a constructive element in these neg
start program, a job corps to retrain adults for an increasingly postindustrial economy and vista, volunteers in service to america, often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs stressing community leadership, local planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the fewly-empowered poor. newly-empowered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war in vietnam drew funding away from slave's operation. offered a choice between war in asia and the war in poverty, johnson reluctantly took the military option. shriver opposed this reordering of priorities, generating the observation in washington and elsewhere, quote: like the poor, we have shriver always with us, end of quote. nevertheless, between 1964 and 1968 one-third of america's poor moved upward out of poverty. by the spring of 1968, tension over the budget priorities led shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrat
. >> there is a 5% county hotel tax. so visitors that spend the night here will contribute to our economy as well. >> the county plans its budget with some presumed revenue from games, but postseason play is bonus money. >>> the profits come for the businesses, too. this kind of success gets people to buy merchandise even if they wouldn't normally do it. >> i'm going to wear my jersey and i'm going to hang out with him, and i'm going to cheer loud, like i've been a fan all my life. >> this is for my sister-in- law. i hope it's on tv and she sees it. we have a wager tonight. i'm preparing for the wager loss. >> won't be surprised to learn that rg3's jersey is popular. it's the highest selling jersey in the nfl since the league started keeping track in 2006. >>> the sticking points are til namely the income level for higher tax rates and what to do about the inheritance tax. congress is working tonight at finding some way to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. the usual complaints have not ended, each side casting blame on the other. the vice president came back from delaware to talk with senator mit
economy, that means consumers have a lot less money to make purchases, which means businesses are going to have a lot less customers, which means that they're less likely to hire, and the whole economy could slow down at a time when the economy's starting to pick up and we're seeing signs of recovery in housing and employment numbers improving. and so what congress needs to do, first and foremost, is to prevent taxes from going up for the vast majority of americans. and this was a major topic of discussion throughout the campaign. what i said was is that we should keep taxes where they are for 98% of americans, 97% of small businesses, but if we're serious about deficit reduction, we should make sure that the wealthier are paying a little bit more and combine that with spending cuts to reduce our deficit and put our economy on a long-term trajectory of growth. we have been talking to the republicans ever since the election was over. they have had trouble saying yes to a number of repeated offers. yesterday i had another meeting with the leadership, and i suggested to them if they can't
. and for the average family, that could mean a loss of $2,000 in income. for the entire economy, that means consumers have a lot less money to make purchases, which means businesses are going to have a lot less customers, which means that they're less likely to hire and the whole economy could slow down at a time when the economy is starting to pick up and we're seeing signs of recovery in housing and employment numbers improving. so what congress needs to do first and foremost, is to prevent taxes from going up for the vast majority of americans. and this was a major topic of discussion throughout the campaign. what i said was, that we should keep taxes where they are for 98% of americans. 97% of small businesses. but if we're serious about deficit reduction, we should make sure that the wealthy are paying a little bit more and combine that with spending cuts to reduce our deficit and put our economy on a long-term trajectory of growth. we have been talking to the republicans ever since the election was over. they have had trouble saying yes to a number of repeated offers. yesterday i had another me
, and looking forward, is the economy headed for rebound orie session? will the new year bring a with iran? our panel is here with their prediction. >>> welcome to this special edition of "the journal editorial report" as we look back at the year that was and the challenges that face us in 2013. first to our stories of 2012 and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the re-election of president barack obama, politics on the national level headed in a decidedly liberal direction. so what happened? and what does it mean for the country going forward? joining the panel this week, "wall streetf journal" columnist and political diary editor jason riley and washington columnist kim strossel. dan, we would like to say for a longtime we live in a center right country. if you l look at the last two presidential elections, that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living in a new progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i am not sure about the country. i think what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the t
. these are your headlines from around the world. >> with just one week to go before the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff, lawmakers are pointing fingers and playing the blame game. >> mario monti is saying he's available to lead italy. he'll run for office in the upcoming election, but only for a party willing to push his agenda. >>> but he has competition in the form of sylvia berlusconi. he tells cnbc he feels a responsibility to run. >> feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party. >> and the crowds are out, the stores are ringing up those sales, but u.s. shoppers may be running low on holiday spirit. and analysts say that they're spending less, as well. hi, everybody. welcome. merry christmas out there. thank you for joining us here on the show. what we're looking at today, we've got slightly quiet markets ahead of the u.s. open. what we're seeing, though, that all the markets are being called lower across the board stateside. the dow is being called a bit lower, nasdaq is being called a bit lower and th
. they are said to be seen as lazy and losing their job. this is a good sign for the economy. how so, steve. not for those two reasons . we don't have too much vacation or little. we do it just right. europe had work like we did. you want lopping beer vacation you can have a stagnant economy like europe. we rise taxes we'll havave loer vacation but fewer jobbings. >> you are right. we don't want to be like the french. and people here in the united states and government union. and i was on vacation and check my blackberry and read a rick unger e-mail while on vacation. >> you are never on vacation. >> you work it anyway. nine out of the 10 are checking their work phones. any time to rejuvenate and comeack ragged. >> we need that vacation time to work better. >> when you say economy you arealking about gdp. good or ill it is major transaction. have everyone never talk a day off and work 60 hours a week. steve is protesting that. >> there is it a correlation between vacation time and increased productity. a 2010tudy show that americans fe refreshed and better about their jobs coming back it is
in a difficult economy with little clarity. >> the economy will go down sharply. >> look at the number from the tax policy center. this is the average tax hit the families take on top of what they pay on taxes. those make between $40,000 and $50,000 pay extra $1700. >> if you manage to make over $200,000, it will be a big jump up. you will need to send a check to uncle sam for $14,000 initial dollars. $500,000 to $1 million pays $34,000 more. they want $215,000 on top of what you pay in taxes. >> the wealth manager says the money you have left as far as businesses also deal with their own tax hikes. >> you are going to see less money in your paycheck. >> the government has to bite the bullet with $1.2 trillion in spending cuts. more than half of that is to the defense budget. >> they say families may need austerity calculation before making big purchases. look at the money you have and the money you need in the future to decide if you need the next big picture. doug? >> doug: thank you, molly. residents of the webster new york neighborhood set ablaze christmas eve have been allowed to retur
in new delhi. mario monti says the most important thing is to get italy's economy back on track. the opposition leaders in egypt have called for an investigation into allegations of fraud. the muslim brotherhood says 64% voting yes after two rounds of voting and 36% voted no. the official votes are expected on monday, but the turnout for both rounds was incredibly low, averaging around 32%. we have more now from cairo. >> the opposition response was quick. been maintained the position they do not consider the constitution -- they maintain the position that they do not consider the constitution legitimate and will continue fighting it by peaceful means. >> we will not allow them to change the identity of egypt going forward. and we will also change the constitution. >> after claiming irregularities, the high election commission promised to look into them thoroughly, but it is not clear if the election will deem these irregularities secure -- serious enough to investigate. in cairo, the opposition begins. >> the constitution is built on iran foundation. we revolutionaries have pro
takes a look back at all the major reviews. the debates with the prime minister on the british economy and the european union budget. the british parliament is in recess for the holidays. members return on january 7th. >> hello there. and welcome to the west minister review. our look back at the big events in parliament over the last three months. coming up in this program, the chancellor delivers the latest bleak economic view? his budget. david cameron's bench urges him to stand up to europe. >> i support absolutely. >> the ugly specter of child abuse hits the deadlines with some dramatic consequences. lord justin levisohn delivers his plan on press standards. >> we should be wary of any legislation that has the potential to infringe free speech and a free press. >> the queen sits in on a cabinet meeting at number 10. but let's begin with the subject which has dominated politics and our pockets for many months, the state of our economy. at the start of december the chancellor came to deliver his autumn statement or mini budget. it set out the latest figures for the growth, tax and be
negative about the economy next year. if you look at projections of 2013, people generally felt the economy would continue to grow, housing would continue to improve, but what's been holding us back is the dysfunction here in washington. and if, you know, people start seeing that on january 1st this problem still hasn't been solved, that we haven't seen the deficit reduction that we could have had had the republicans been willing to take the deal that i gave them, if they say that people's taxes have gone up, which means consumer spending is going to be depressed, then, obviously, that's going to have an adverse reaction in the markets. >> what about automatic spending cuts? those take effect january 1st, as well. do they have to be part of this deal? you've got half of those cuts in defense law? >> well, congress agreed they would cut an additional $1.2 trillion in spending. they put a committee together to try to come up with those numbers. they didn't figure out how to do it. so what we now have is a situation where these automatic spending cuts go into place. now, if we have raised some
the economy and ultimately his legacy. even though he can blame republicans in the short-term in the long term when they look back to this period this is going to attach to the president. is he feeling now an obligation to finally lead on this issue. and hopefully he will bring some democrats in the house and the senate along but it's going to have to be something that republicans can support. republicans are not going to a . and obviously so we're going to be very interested in the particulars of this as they begin to emerge. i'm just glad finally that the president is here. but to your point, it is true a lot of democrats get what they want. they get higher taxes automatically on january 1st. and they get steep cuts in the defense budget. but i will tell you what, there are an awful lot of people that would be hurt by that particularly small businesses and job creators and that's why it is so important that we do everything we can to get an outcome here that doesn't hurt jobs and the economy. >> this is, again, i don't get this. the president says he is worried about this having an impact on
. and housing continues to be the bright spot in the u.s. economy: home prices post their biggest advance in two years. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! christmas may be over, but the holiday shopping season continues. many consumers hit the malls today to return gifts and buy what they really wanted. and this is the time many gift cards get redeemed. but for retailers, holiday sales so far have been a flop. sales in the two months leading up to christmas, rose just 0.7%, according to mastercard advisors that tracks the numbers. that's way below what the retail industry was predicting. erika miller spoke with retail expert dana telsey and began by asking what happened. >> i think there were a confluence of events, extra long season. hurricane sandy. tragedy in ct. >> none of the events out there were feel good factor events. it was all for consumer morale. >> when you look at the weakness this holiday season, how much of the blame do you put on retailers for not having inspiring merchandise and how much of it are just factors beyond their control like the economy and the fiscal cliff? >> i thi
expected to skyrocket, but even with the deal some say the u.s. economy may fall. i am joined now by an economics professor for the university of maryland. welcome back to the show. i know you get pulled on this all the time by different groups. what are you expecting out of the economy? what do you say? with the deal what happens to the economy? without a deal what happens? >> some kind of deal, the economy continues to grow very slowly. we are doing all this spending to prop up the economy because the fundamentals are right. all of the things the obama administration has done have been anti growth, whether energy policy, trade with china, reregulation of wall street. and now this, taxing all those jobs creators, all those small businesses. i don't know why you would want to invest in this country now. gerri: let me ask you this. the congressional budget office has out its numbers. if the fiscal cliff hits they say u.s. gdp would shrink by half a percentage point and that unemployment will rise to over 9%. do you think they have the rights or are they just too conservative? will
is still the same. we're going to have a less competitive economy because of what is coming out of washington. adam: chime in, rick said, nah why do you say that? >> you will get a tax increase. i think number will be closer to 500,000 before we're done. certainly closer than 250,000. this is, i don't know, for years i've had to listen to this, it is going to hurt our economy if we raise taxes on the top 2%. there are many things happening that can hurt our economy. the fact we're having this conversation two or three days before the end of the year is hurtings our economy. adam: but we've seen that. >> raising taxes isn't going to be it. adam: let me bring dan back in here. dan, i want to ask you, raising taxes only raises $80 billion at best in a budget almost a trillion dollars over budget. so what do you to fix that problem? >> all we have to do to balance the budget in 10 years limit the growth of government spending so that the budget climbs by an average 2.5% a year. in my mind, this isn't about the short term because whatever speed bump we go over we're going to go over.
in the southern city of kochin represents the booming economy. and with growth projections here as high as 7% for the year, the expanding indian market for goal could push prices past $2500 an ounce. "buy it, keep it, buy 24-carat gold, put it in a locker, and when you need money, turn around and sell it and make good money on it." > > and come to umreth to do it. "yes, come to my shop!" reporting from india, paul eggers, first business news. the indian government tightly regulates the gold market by testing jewelery for quality. chokesee believes this is a positive, because it helps protect customers from low- quality pieces. an overwhelming number of parents in the u.s. believe their children are growing up without learning valuable life skills such as how to manage their money. as many as 7 out of 10 parents expect these lessons to be taught in public school. nathaniel and stacey didomenico's young daughter, arianna, is more ahead of the game than she realizes. "we've already started with our daughter. there are things she wants at the store and we explain that it costs money, we have to
. how does it help the broad economy though? >> what you're seeing is readjusting of the economy. most of this tax money ces out ofhose m making 250,000 or mo more, an increase on those individuals. at the same time that we're finding out her on capitol hill about a drease on those making 250 or less, so, majority of amerans. when we have this increase on aery small portion, we see that those folks are welcoming this increase, a poll released the day befor christm put thugh american express and the harrison group, saw that 67% of those making 1% or more want today see this increase happen. >> all right. let move on to todd, because i can tell you that there are a lot of tax ineases just in this health care law, i didn't even mention some of them at the top of the show, todd. what i tking about additional payroll tax for those making more than $250,000, a taxable taxing and spending, and how much health care you can write off every year, and people don't know how much it will hurt them and the broad economy. >> that's right, they haven't en it taken out of their paychecks yet. this is
and government spending cuts in january, leaving far less money in the economy. the international monetary fund warrants of knock on effects for the global economy. -- warns of knock on effects for the global economy. the pressure is on in washington to agree on a plan. only then might the applause on wall street be a little more genuine. >> with the clock ticking ever more loudly in washington, let's bring in our correspondent. first off, are the prospects of an agreement as dim as we are hearing, or could there be a last-minute deal? then of course this could happen, but i think it is quite unlikely. there is an increased pessimism that a deal can be achieved in washington, d.c. from my perspective, i think washington moves too slowly. tax rates will go for all americans, and cuts will go into effect by the end of this year, and we will see no more unemployment benefits for about 2 million americans. >> there are some technicalities here. what are the government's contingency plans? for example, how will it go about paying bills if no deal is reached? >> a couple of bills they will just not b
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